Recycling

  • What Happens to Your Recycling?

    Once your recyclable are picked up at your curb, most residents don't exactly know where they go and what happens to them. We're here to break down the process and hopefully clear up some confusion on what exactly happens to the recycling you put out on your curbside. 

    Materials Recycling Facilities

    After your hauler picks up your recycling, it is brought to a nearby sorting facility. This facility is called a material recovery facility (MRF). This facility receives and separates recycling by material, and prepares recyclables for manufactures. The illustration below shows the general process to how recycling is separated in a MRF.

     

     Material Recovery Facility Infographic

     

    Recycling → Commodities

    Once the recyclables are sorted by material, they are baled into compact cubes. These cubes are now considered commodities, since they can be sold to manufactures. Consumers drive the value of these commodities. A demand by consumers for products made using recyclable materials creates a need for manufactures to use these materials, thus increasing the value of the recycled material.

    Paper

    Recycled paper materials are sold to paper mills where they are further processed before being sold to manufactures. Recycled paper is often used in toilet paper, egg cartons, and paper towel rolls.

    Metals

    The bales of metals are sent to smelting facilities where they are further processed before being manufactured into new products. Because metal doesn't break down easily, recycled metal can be used to make a variety of products like aluminum or tin cans, file cabinets, or tin foil.

    Glass

    The glass cullet is sent to glass processing facilities. Glass can be recycled an infinite number of times, so recycled glass is often manufactured right back into what it was: bottles and jars.

    Plastic

    Plastic bales are sold to plastic recycling facilities where they are most often down-cycled into things like lawn furniture, garbage cans, carpets, and park benches.

  • What is Household Hazardous Waste?

    Household hazardous waste

    Household Hazardous Waste, or HHW, is any chemical or product that can cause serious illness or pose an environmental or health threat if improperly stored, transported or disposed of. When hazardous waste is disposed of in the trash, down the drain, or on the ground, our water and soils can be contaminated or trash collectors can be harmed. Most products labeled dangerous, flammable, poison, combustible and corrosive are considered hazardous waste.

    Examples of Household Hazardous Waste:

    Automotive:

    • Auto batteries
    • Antifreeze
    • Oils/Filters
    • Tires

    Lawn and Garden:

    • Fertilizers
    • Lighter Fluid
    • Pesticides
    • Pool chemicals

    Household Items:

    • Aerosol cans
    • Batteries (non-alkaline)
    • Cleaners
    • Fluorescent bulbs
    • Furniture polish
    • Needles/syringes/lancets
    • Nail polish
    • Propane/compressed gas cylinders

    Home Improvement:

    • Driveway sealer
    • Paint
    • Paint remover/stripper/thinner
    • Solvents

    Special Disposal for Household Hazardous Waste:

    • Keep it out of the drains, storm sewers, and off the ground. Chemicals disposed of through these methods can pollute rivers, lakes and aquifers.
    • Keep it out of the trash.  Hazardous products can cause a problem for waste haulers and at waste facilities.

    If you can't use up household hazardous chemicals or give them to someone who will, take the items to The Recycling Zone, Dakota County's recycling facility in Eagan, MN. Residents can bring household hazardous waste to be properly disposed of at The Recycling Zone for free.

     

     

  • What You Can Do At Home To Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle

    REDUCE:

    REUSE:

    RECYCLE:

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  • When is Composting Better Than Recycling?

    As more and more people turn to composting as a way to reduce their environmental impact, we are faced with a dilemma: is composting always better when it comes to paper? You may have heard that paper can only be recycled between five and seven times so it's easy to assume composting is a good alternative to recycling when the fibers are getting shorter. However, it's a little more complicated than that. By keeping paper out of the recycling bin, we are increasing the demand on trees, water and energy required to make virgin paper. So, to help break it down we have put together a list of the most confusing paper items to tell you whether composting or recycling is a better alternative. 

     

     

Contact Us

City Education Department
13713 Frontier Court
Burnsville, MN 55337-3817
Phone: 952-895-4559

Dakota Valley Recycling

DVR is the partnership recycling department for the Cities of Apple Valley, BurnsvilleEagan and Lakeville that connects residents and businesses to recycling, composting and waste disposal information.

DVR is not a drop off facility and does not accept any materials for recycling.